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Intellectual Property Trademark U.S. Trademark

You’ve got to “use” your trademark

Let’s take a look at an interesting story:

By the time Apple Inc. debuted iPhone in January 2007, the prefix “i” had already become a thing of Apple. The inauguration of iMac series dates back in 1998. In 2003, iPod was a mega hit.

Lesser known than Apple, however, there was a startup called InfoGear Technology Corporation, which developed an internet phone technology, called “iPhone.”

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Intellectual Property Trademark U.S. Trademark

For DIY TM Applicants: What’s a Strong tradeMark?

There is a “strong mark” and a “weak mark”. You don’t need to know all legal distinctions as to different types of marks, but you want to have a strong mark, right? Here’s a shortcut to get to the goal.

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Intellectual Property Trademark U.S. Trademark

What is Trade Dress?

When it comes to trademark (or servicemark), brand names, symbols, and logo designs are the first things to come to your mind. However, there are other types of trademarks that are protected. For example, a sound or packaging is also protected by the trademark law.

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Intellectual Property Trademark U.S. Trademark

Cheapest Way to Protect Your Trade Name (or Trademark, Servicemark, etc)

Have you been to a Burger King restaurant in Mattoon, Illinois? I mean the other Burger King restaurant. There is a restaurant called Burger King, which has nothing to do with Burger King franchise.

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Intellectual Property Trademark U.S. Trademark

When to Register Trademark?

Most clients come to me after their products reached the market. In fact, that’s when you know for sure that your product has the potential to be something. If not, why invest in registering trademark?

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Intellectual Property Trademark U.S. Trademark

Outline – Trademark

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Intellectual Property TEAS plus Trademark Trademark Application U.S. Trademark

$225 to Register a Trademark?

We have discussed the importance of trademark in “Amazon Suggests Branding for All“, and compared good and bad trademarks in “How often do you Google your trademark“. This time, we will learn about how to register a trademark.

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Intellectual Property Trademark U.S. Trademark

How often do you Google your trademark?

How do you react to a sight of a retail store that just launched? Early adopters enjoy using a product or service before other people do, but most of the consumers tend to be a lot less passionate about embracing a new store although its sight might pop among aging stores.

That is why many businesses spend fortune to run commercials on TV and place advertisements on publications to familiarize their trademarks to customers. Since an excessive amount of advertisements is pouring in through various media, most modern consumers consider the ads as something they want to avoid as much as possible.

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Intellectual Property Trademark U.S. Trademark

Amazon Suggests Branding for All

Approaching the 2017 holiday shopping season, the e-commerce giant Amazon’s stock price is heading to $1,200. Amazon.com, often quoted as “The Everything Store”, reportedly accounts for 46% of the entire online retail sales.

An interesting thing about shopping at Amazon.com is that you do not particularly notice the items sold directly by Amazon. All items sold at Amazon receive the same treatment, and the same format applies to all product pages. The product order is determined by objective statistics like sales, rating, and price. Quite often, items sold by third-party sellers are bestsellers or Amazon’s Choice.

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Intellectual Property Trademark U.S. Trademark

What is Trademark?

A trademark is a mark you use in order to identify your good or service.

For instance, IPfever is a trademark as it’s associated with services and contents offered at IPfever.com. If a law professor wants to start a blog about IP, she shouldn’t name it IPfever. Such naming would mislead people to think that the blog was associated with IPfever.

But, on the other hand, if a medical researcher encounters a feverish symptom related to Information Profession, she’s free to call it “IP fever,” to publish a paper titled “IP fever,” and so on. There’s no problem with such designation because the trademark IPfever, at the moment, has nothing to do with medical diagnosis.

So, you can freely catch an IPfever, and you may sell an IPfever brand roasted coffees. But you may not provide an IPfever service if that’s related to what is offered on ipfever.com.

That’s a brief overview of what trademark does and doesn’t. Let’s find out more.