Common questions:
patent-specification

Patent Specification in your application is the body of your application.

Your patent claims will be read in the context of the specification. Therefore, the specification should include all the information necessary to figure out what you claimed in your patent claim(s).  Roughly speaking, it should be an all-inclusive manual for your invention.

It's part of the deal you're making with the public.

You're disclosing  your invention to the public, and in exchange you'll be granted a monopoly for a limited time. To ensure fairness in this deal, you're required to fully and comprehensibly disclose your invention without hiding anything.

You should focus on making the invention available to the public. 

If you want to hide something from the public, you're free to do so by opting out from disclosing it, in which case you shouldn't claim it either. However, you shouldn't attempt to hide even a minute detail of your claimed invention because it can invalidate your patent retrospectively.

For example, let's say you know two ways to make your invention. You know one works better than the other, but you don't want people know about the better one. If you disclose the other one only, the patent will be held invalid.

If you don't claim it now, you may lose it forever.

You may be tempted to include everything you know in your patent application because it would make sure you disclose adequately. Be careful when you include something in your disclosure which are not claimed. Filing a patent application is considered a publication. If you publish something, you will have a year to file a patent application for it. After that, you can't patent it.

There's much more.

Although you can learn a lot from the patent applications you found during your clearance search, it's still not a perfect guide for your specification. To understand your claim, one must read the specification. For this reason, asking an attorney who reviewed your claim(s) to review your specification could be a lot less time-consuming than you think. You don't need to pay for the separate availability retainer in that case. Just talk to the lawyer who reviewed your claim(s).

 

Talk to the lawyer who reviewed your claim(s).